#BadMoonRising Hullaba Lulu: A Dieselpunk Adventure by Teagan Riordain Geneviene #steampunk #historicalfantasy

Happy Monday!  Today’s guest is sure to pull you out of your Monday morning slump.  Her creativity knows no limits, and she’s brought along Lulu, her main character, to join in for the interview.  I’m willing to bet a lifetime supply of chocolate you’d never guess which movie scared her so much she couldn’t sleep.  Welcome Teagan Riordain Geneviene!

Hi, Teri. Thanks so much for letting Lulu and me be part of Bad Moon Rising 2020! (Lulu, there’s a bit of horseradish on your mouth. Ugh, did you just burp?)

As I was about to say, I don’t write real horror, but Hullaba Lulu — a Dieselpunk Adventure has some pos-i-lutely creepy moments. In honor of Bad Moon Rising, my new novella is priced at 99¢ (Kindle version only), throughout October. (What Lulu? Yes, I know that cold hand on your shoulder in the abandoned train station really scared you. Now, stop that, Lulu. I know you’re excited, but if you dance the Lindy Hop in Teri’s office, you’ll knock something over. Hey, do I smell giggle water on your breath?)

Anyhow, it’s been fun seeing not just everyone’s answers, but the questions they chose. Here are my answers. They tell a little bit about me. (Shush, Lulu! Nobody needs to know that much about me.)

Fun Questions

Andy Warhol and Tennessee Williams, Wikipedia. Tomfoolery by Teagan
Andy Warhol and Tennessee Williams, Wikipedia. Tomfoolery by Teagan

Has a movie or book scared you so much you couldn’t sleep? Which one?

The Doors (1991) with Val Kilmer. No, that’s not a horror movie, but I woke up screaming — more than once afterward. There was a short bit about Andy Warhol in the movie. Heaven knows how my subconscious works, but I had a couple of nightmares from which I woke up screaming. LOL, Andy Warhol was about to get me, who knows for what nefarious intent. Haha. For at least a month the backbeat of Break on Through to the Other Side pulsed in my head. I love that song, but ever since, I’ve felt a creepy otherworldly association with it. Like I say ― I’m not wired right! (What Lulu? You’re right, the Ouija board navigation system in Valentino’s train isn’t wired right either.)

If you were in a horror movie, would you rather have a loaded gun or a car that wouldn’t break down?

Lulu and Friends by Teagan R Geneviene
Lulu and Friends by Teagan R Geneviene

Give me the car. I have terrible aim. I did “target practice” a couple of times with some friends. We were using their old barn. I literally could not hit the broad side of that barn. However, there have been a times when I’ve had to perform some rather impressing driving maneuvers ― but that is not a story for today. Yeah… definitely the car, not the gun. (Oh, and don’t bring Lulu — she doesn’t know how to drive, as you’ll see in the novella.)

Would you rather put your hand in a box and feel something slimy or furry?

I’m really not sure, that depends on the context. However, in a real life case, it was something furry. Decades ago, my beloved cat went down the tubes of an open dryer vent. (I was lied to about the surrounding circumstances. I had to live somewhere that was not my home, during my divorce. I was told the dryer was hooked up properly, even though the person I was staying with knew that was a lie.) After singlehandedly moving both the washer and dryer (at least twice ― I had an adrenalin surge) trying to find my cat, I heard a raspy hissing sound down inside that hole/tube/vent. I wasn’t sure if it might be a snake or a rat, but I prayed it was the cat. I thrust my hand into the tube (equal to the box in your scenario). My fingers reached something furry, and I grabbed on. Thank goodness it was the cat. (Yes, Lulu. Teri is the cat’s pajamas.)

Writing Questions

Pearl, Lulu, Rose, & Bot in "Sideways" Atlantic City, by Teagan R Geneviene
Pearl, Lulu, Rose, & Angel-Bot in “Sideways” Atlantic City, by Teagan R Geneviene

What was the hardest scene to write in your featured book?

The ending, with all the wild concepts I had to pull together, was by far the hardest. Plus, where there’s Lulu, there’s trouble. That’s why she’s called Hullaba Lulu. So, on top of all that, I had to end with something at which I could hint that Lulu is about to do, off screen, that would result in chaos. (I know, Lulu. I want to write that sequel too. Just drink that jorum of skee and don’t give any spoilers.)

Which comes first for you – plot or characters?

Actually… neither, at least most of the time. Usually, the thing that comes first for me is the world I build. Lulu is an exception to that rule. The title character and her two friends, Pearl and Rose, were inspired by the song “Don’t Bring Lulu.” It was recorded by Billy Murray in 1925. My Lulu stays “wild and wooly” true to the flapper described in the lyrics of the song. (Yes, I know you hate that song, Lulu. Now stop touching things in Teri’s office.)

Describe your writing space.

Oh… I admit this is a bad thing, and I certainly don’t recommend it. Lately my writing space is me plopped in the middle of my bed with my laptop. It’s the quietest room in the house. I can stare out the window to the back yard when my brain needs to dance away for a moment. My back hates me for it though. One of these days I’ll finish my office. (Lulu, you know I don’t have any angel-bots to do the work. Heaven knows I wish I did!)

What are you working on now?

White Gogo Boots Teagan R Geneviene
Image by Teagan R. Geneviene

I’m afraid that I have to remain fairly secretive about my novel in progress. That’s hard because it’s such slow going… Or maybe that’s why it’s going so slowly — because I thrive on sharing. However, I’ll tell this much… It started with my mental image of go-go boots like the ones I had as a little girl, and them stepping onto sandy pavement. It’s a genre mash-up set in the 1960s, and there are cats. I’m grateful to Dan Antion and Olga Núñez Miret for doing alpha reads of part-1. (No Lulu. It isn’t your sequel. I told you not to touch things. Put that down.)

Cover and Blurb

Hullaba Lulu cover by Teagan R. Geneviene
Hullaba Lulu cover by Teagan R. Geneviene

Hullaba Lulu, a Dieselpunk Adventure is a wild and wooly 1920s fantasy story. Lulu, the heroine is inspired by the song, “Don’t Bring Lulu,” from 1925 ― so are her pals, Pearl and Rose. My Lulu loves to dance, and freely indulges in giggle water. She snores and burps and says whatever she wants. Lulu is a snarky but good-hearted flapper. The song’s inspiration stops there, but the story is just beginning.

Travel with Lulu and her friends on a magical, dieselpunk train that belongs to the smolderingly handsome and enigmatic man known only as Valentino. They get into all sorts of trouble, usually due to Lulu’s clumsiness. It’s an intense ride through a number of pos-i-lutely creepy settings, including “sideways” versions of Atlantic City and the Cotton Club. At every stop and in between, Lulu ends up creating chaos. There’s no telling where they’ll end up. No, Lulu! Don’t touch that!

Lulu’s the kind of smarty, breaks up every party,

Hullabaloo loo, don’t bring Lulu,

I’ll bring her myself!

Purchase Links

In honor of Bad Moon Rising, throughout October, the eBooks of Hullaba Lulu are at an introductory price of 99¢. For those who boycott Amazon I made a Kobo eBook too.

Kindle: Click this universal link

Paperback: Click this universal link

Kobo: https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/hullaba-lulu

Hullaba Lulu promo image by Teagan R. Geneviene

Hullaba Lulu promo image by Teagan R. Geneviene

Also…

While it is not exactly a companion volume to any of my Roaring Twenties stories, I’ve written a 1920s slang dictionary. I’m careful to use slang in a context that makes it understandable, but you might enjoy having Speak Flapper. It debuted at #1 in its category at Amazon. Here’s a review from Annika Perry at Goodreads.

Speak Flapper, Slang of the 1920s by Teagan Ríordáin Geneviene
Speak Flapper, Slang of the 1920s by Teagan Ríordáin Geneviene

(Lulu. If you can’t stop touching things, you’ll have to wait in the car. Just go on outside.)

Author Bio

Teagan Ríordáin Geneviene’s work is colored by her experiences from living in the southern states and the desert southwest (of the USA). Teagan most often writes one kind of fantasy or another, including the “Punk” genres, like steampunk, dieselpunk, and atompunk. Whether it’s a 1920s mystery, a steampunk adventure, or an urban fantasy, her stories have a strong element of whimsy. There are no extremes in violence, sex, or profanity.

Her talents also include book covers and promotional images. She makes all of her own. Teagan is currently exploring the idea of offering that service to others.

All of the books by Teagan Ríordáin Geneviene are available at her Amazon Author Page.

Amazon Author Page Universal Link

Her latest release is from the punk genres, Hullaba Lulu, a Dieselpunk Adventure.

Social Media Links

You can also visit me at:

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Teagan-Riordain-Geneviene/e/B00HHDXHVM
Twitter: https://twitter.com/teagangeneviene
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TeagansBooks
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/teagangeneviene/
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoM-z7_iH5t2_7aNpy3vG-Q
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/teagangeneviene/

Lulu! What are you doing? Don’t touch that, Lulu! Akkk! Luluuuu! By-byeeeee Teriiiii!

Fiona Finch and the Pink Valentine by Teagan Riordain Geneviene #bookreview #steampunk

Put your feet up and enjoy a whimsical break with this quick, lighthearted story. There’s some romance, and a lot of silliness. It’s a steampunk/Victorian setting. You might call it a long-short story or a novelette.

This is a tale of an old lost valentine and the shenanigans that ensue when it turns up. Fiona Finch and her brother Steele – along with a helping “wing” from Quellie the duck, work to bring two long ago sweethearts back together. Even though it is a Valentine’s Day story, it does not include sex or passionate romance. It does, however, include a lot of imaginative fun.

I’ve read several books by this author and her creativity never ceases to amaze and delight me.  This tale of a lost valentine from years ago and amusing matchmaking efforts at a masquerade ball is guaranteed to leave you with a smile.  Although a quick read, character development certainly isn’t lacking, and you’ll feel as if you’ve spent time with friends by the end of this whimsical novelette.  And did I mention the pet duck?  An absolute scene-stealer.  If you’re in the mood for a light read with a sweet happily ever after, look no further.

 

 

#BookTrailer Reveal: Dead Steam by Bryce Raffle #horror #steampunk @rrbooktours1

DeadSteam

I am so happy to share this really cool book with you and reveal its amazing trailer! If you like the cover, wait to you see this! There is also a chance to win a digital copy of Dead Steam, so make sure to enter the giveaway at the bottom!

DeadSteam_Ebook.jpgDead Steam: A Chilling Collection of Dreadpunk Tales of the Dark and Supernatural

Expected Publication Date: October 1st, 2018

Genre: Anthology/ Dreadpunk/ Dark Steampunk/ Horror

Reader beware: to open this tome is to invite dread into your heart. Every page you turn will bring you closer to something wicked. And when the dead begin to rise from the steaming pits of hell, only then will you discover that it is already too late. Your life is forfeit.

Featuring an introduction by Leanna Renee Hieber, author of the Eterna Files and Strangely Beautiful saga, DeadSteam plays host to the scintillating writing of David Lee Summers (Owl Dance, The Brazen Shark), Jen Ponce (The Bazaar, Demon’s Cradle), Wendy Nikel (The Continuum), Karen J Carlisle (The Adventures of Viola Stewart), Jonah Buck (Carrion Safari), and more…

With seventeen chilling tales of Dreadpunk, Gaslamp, and Dark Steampunk, DeadSteam will leave you tearing at the pages, desperate for more. For within these pages, the dead rise from their graves to haunt the London Underground, witches whisper their incantations to the wind, a sisterhood of bitten necks hunts fog-drenched alleyways lit only by gaslight, and only one thing is certain: that dread will follow you until you turn that final page.

And that sinking feeling in the pit of your chest? That fear that something is following you, watching you, hunting you? It is not for nothing. Look over your shoulder, dear reader. Watch behind you. Listen to the whispers in the darkness.

But know this…it is all inevitable.

Add to Goodreads

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Excerpt

Burke Street Station

The city was frost and fog. Icy crystals formed on the windows of the train station. Breath drifted up in a hazy clouds like puffs of cigarette smoke as Theodore tried to warm his hands, blowing hot breath onto his stiff, cold fingers and rubbing his hands together vigorously. When that failed, he thrust them back into his coat pockets, cursing under his breath. His threadbare coat offered little warmth. Drafts of wind found their way through the broken stitching and the tears in his sleeves like rats scrambling through the cracks in the station walls. A discarded page of newsprint, caught in the rushing wind, tumbled and turned in the air and landed, crumpled and torn, at Theodore’s feet.

He stooped over, picked it up, and glanced at the engraving of a wanted man. Even without a skill for reading, he knew what name was printed beneath the picture of masked man on the page. Anthony Tidkins.

Wanted, he read. That was one word Theodore recognized. Crimes was another, and then, finally…murder.

Rubbish. The newspapers always tried to make villains out of the radical thinkers of the world. The Resurrectionists, who named their organization after the sack-em-up men who provided the anatomists with subjects for their scientific endeavors, were scientists. They had provided the world with aether, revolutionizing air travel. They had brought Prince Charles back from the brink of death. They had devised the engines for the London Underground. Anthony Tidkins himself promised to cure death. Yet the newspaper men still called for his blood. Theodore balled up the page and shoved it in his pocket.

He pulled out his trick coin as he approached the gate. The station master was asleep at his booth, a little dribble of spit running down his chin. Typical. Thoedore stuck his coin in the machine, waited for the gate to open, and then, with a light tug on the fishing line threaded through a little hole in the tip of the coin, it popped back out. Easy. He was in before anybody noticed what he had done. He pocketed the coin and started down the hallway.

Tap-tap, clack, tap-tap, clack, his shoes beat a rhythm on the stone steps. The sole of his left shoe was beginning to wear, and the heel of his shoe tapped against the heel of his foot as he walked. He puffed on his hands again, and peeked over his shoulder. No one was after him. He had done this trick a thousand times before. So why did he feel like there was someone watching him?

Clack, tap-tap, clack. Again, he glanced over his shoulder. The odd double-rhythm of his broken shoe was suddenly unnerving in the deserted station. Where were all the other passengers? Nice folks avoided this place like the plague, especially after midnight. The oil lamps that lit Burke Street Station were so routinely out of oil that he could hardly find his own feet in front of him, but still, Theodore expected to see other passengers. But where were the other vagrants? They should be sleeping in the dark corners of the hallway under blankets made of rags. And the boys from the blacking factory should be heading home from their long shifts, fingers stained black with powders and oil. But there was no one. Only the rats skittering through rat tunnels to keep him company.

Tap-tap, clack, tap-tap, clack.

Another set of footsteps began to follow his own, beating out a different rhythm. A steady tap, tap, tap, tap. He paused to listen, and nothing but silence greeted him. He glanced over his shoulder. Nobody there.

He continued onward, and again, a second set of footsteps started up behind him. He paused to listen. This time, they didn’t stop.

Tap, tap, tap, tap.

Whoever it was, they were getting closer. Closer and closer, louder and louder, tapping out a steady rhythm as they approached down the long, dark hallway. He could almost make out the solitary figure in the gloomy, hazy light, but then the fog grew thicker, and whatever he thought he’d seen was gone. The footsteps kept on getting louder, though, and closer. He turned and ran down the hallway.

A long flight of steps delved deeper into the darkness of Burke Street Station, down, down toward the platform. The train was already rumbling, announcing its approach. It vibrated through Theodore’s toes to the tip of his spine, rattling his bones.

He grabbed the railing all but flew down the staircase. The rumble of the train grew louder and clearer.

“Shit,” Theodore cursed. Taking the steps two at a time, he hurtled down the steps and didn’t stop when he reached the bottom.

Nails on a blackboard. The tines of silverware scraping against a ceramic plate. The screaming madmen at Newgate Asylum. The anguished cry of a mother weeping over her stillborn babe. Theodore had heard these sounds all, but not one compared to the shrill screech of an automatic train rolling into Burke Street. Iron wheels grinding against iron tracks. Hot metal sending up sparks, belching out steam as black as sin. The carriages rattling and clanging against one another. The hiss of hot coal burning in the engines. The shriek of brakes as the train ground to a halt. If it went on long enough, it would surely drive a man mad. Theodore covered his ears with his hands, pressing them against his head to muffle out the deafening noise, and waited for the thundering train to come to a halt.

When it did, he realized it must have drowned out the sound of the steadily approaching footsteps he’d heard in the hallway, because he could hear them again, and they were closer. So close he half expected to feel someone’s hot breath on his neck. He whirled around, but there was no one there. Silence greeted him like an old friend. His heart hammered against his chest.

“There’s no one there,” he muttered to himself. But he didn’t sound convinced.

A smell lingered in the air, as if something foul had passed through. The smell was familiar enough, the breath of a man with rotting teeth. It was a foul, cloying stench. He spun around again, and this time found himself face to face with the man to whom those dreaded footsteps belonged.

Only he wasn’t a man. Not really.

About the Author

Bryce Raffle.png

Bryce Raffle writes steampunk, horror, and fantasy. He was the lead writer for Ironclad Games’ multiplayer online game Sins of A Dark Age and is the founder of Grimmer & Grimmer Books. His short stories have appeared in numerous anthologies, including Hideous Progeny: Classic Horror Goes Punk, Denizens of Steam and Den of Antiquity. His short story, The Complications of Avery Vane, was awarded Best Steampunk Short in the Preditors and Editors Reader’s Poll in 2016. He lives in beautiful Vancouver, Canada, where he works in the film industry.

Bryce Raffle| Facebook | Instagram| Goodreads | Twitter

Bryce is giving away a digital copy of Dead Steam to one lucky winner. The giveaway will run from Sept. 17th to Sept. 20th so make sure you enter!

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Book Trailer Reveal Organized By:

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R&R Book Tours

Timekeeper (Timekeeper #1) by Tara Sim #bookreview #steampunk #YA #TuesdayBookBlog

I was in an accident. I got out. I’m safe now.

An alternate Victorian world controlled by clock towers, where a damaged clock can fracture time—and a destroyed one can stop it completely.

A prodigy mechanic who can repair not only clockwork but time itself, determined to rescue his father from a Stopped town.

A series of mysterious bombings that could jeopardize all of England.

A boy who would give anything to relive his past, and one who would give anything to live at all.

A romance that will shake the very foundations of time. 

I think I’m a steampunk fan – I’ve read several steampunk books and enjoyed all of them, and I adored the Victorian London setting in this novel.

The whole premise of clocks controlling time tantalized me, and I connected with Danny almost immediately.  I know clocks and cogs aren’t for everyone, but the fact that Danny could ‘feel’ time and diagnose a clock’s problem fascinated me.  His relationship with Colton was very sweet, although a bit on the ‘insta-love’ side, but I chose to overlook that.

Timekeeper had been in my TBR for a while, and when the theme for one of my book clubs was an LGBT novel, I immediately thought of this one.  A perfect selection, and one I’d recommend.

Clockwork Dynasty by Daniel H. Wilson #bookreview #sci-fi

An ingenious new thriller that weaves a path through history, following a race of human-like machines that have been hiding among us for untold centuries, written by the New York Times bestselling author of Robopocalypse.

Present day: When a young anthropologist specializing in ancient technology uncovers a terrible secret concealed in the workings of a three-hundred-year-old mechanical doll, she is thrown into a hidden world that lurks just under the surface of our own. With her career and her life at stake, June Stefanov will ally with a remarkable traveler who exposes her to a reality she never imagined, as they embark on an around-the-world adventure and discover breathtaking secrets of the past…

Russia, 1725: In the depths of the Kremlin, the tsar’s loyal mechanician brings to life two astonishingly humanlike mechanical beings. Peter and Elena are a brother and sister fallen out of time, possessed with uncanny power, and destined to serve great empires. Struggling to blend into pre-Victorian society, they are pulled into a legendary war that has raged for centuries.

The Clockwork Dynasty seamlessly interweaves past and present, exploring a race of beings designed to live by ironclad principles, yet constantly searching for meaning. As June plunges deeper into their world, her choices will ultimately determine their survival or extermination. Richly-imagined and heart-pounding, Daniel H. Wilson’s novel expertly draws on his robotics and science background, combining exquisitely drawn characters with visionary technology–and riveting action. – Goodreads.com

Do I really need to say how ravishing this cover is?  I’ve read several other books by this author and he has yet to disappoint me.

The chapters alternate between past, present, and various settings in history and reveal how Peter and June are connected.  The history of the avtomats and how they each live by their ‘word’ is intriguing and I would have liked more details, but it looks like there’s a sequel, so I’m assuming the author plans to expand on that in a future book.  With intricate avtomat design descriptions and vivid imagery, the action scenes play out like a movie (especially when June experiences claustrophobia) – and I can easily picture this as a movie.

There’s no doubt I enjoyed Clockwork Dynasty, but I admit the pacing was a bit slow in a few places and I skimmed through some pages.  While Peter’s character was well-developed (I kept forgetting he wasn’t human), June felt a little flat and other than her engineering talents, I knew next to nothing about her.

If you’re familiar with Wilson’s books, you know they tend to revolve around artificial intelligence and robotics, so if that’s your thing, this is your book.  If, however, you’re looking for more of a steampunk feel, the cover is slightly misleading.  In my opinion, this book leans more toward sci-fi.

Thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for the digital ARC.

Blog Tour: The Cogsmith’s Daughter by Kate M. Colby

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I’m honored to have Kate M. Colby as a guest on Books & Such today!  Her book, The Cogsmith’s Daughter, was released on October 15th and Kate is here today to tell us more about the world of Desertera.

The Religion of Desertera

If you’ve been following my blog tour, you’ll know quite a bit about Desertera, the world of my novel, The Cogsmith’s Daughter. (If you haven’t been following, welcome to the party!) In short, Desertera is a dystopian steampunk world without steam—a desert wasteland that renders the steam-powered mechanisms of the former steampunk society useless. After all, without excess water to create steam, the society’s technology cannot be powered.

But how did Desertera get this way? How did the world go from a typical steampunk society (much like the traditional, Victorian-era London commonly depicted in books of the genre) to a post-apocalyptic wasteland? Here’s an excerpt from The Cogsmith’s Daughter, where my protagonist, Aya, remembers the religious beliefs her father taught her:

“Our people didn’t always live in Desertera, Aya.” Papa pulled her onto his lap. “Once, hundreds of years ago, our ancestors lived in a beautiful, lush land—a land filled with grass and trees and lakes and rivers. There were rolling hills, open meadows, and flowers, all kinds of colorful flowers.”

“Was there still sand?” Aya brushed a few grains from the hem of her skirt.

“There was but only at the edge of the ocean and in lands far away from ours. Our land was full of nature and cities. Oh, the cities, Aya! They were full of metal and stone with buildings as tall as the sky. All the machines ran by gears and cogs, like the gizmos in my shop, and there was enough water and steam to power every single one. More than that, there was enough water and steam to power entire cities, whole countries.” Papa swept his hand in the air, pointing at all the gadgets and beyond the ceiling.

“What happened to it all?”

Papa sighed. “Do you remember what I told you about the Gods?”

Aya nodded. “There is a kingdom above our heads, a whole world of gods in the sky. The Almighty King and the Benevolent Queen were married, but then the Almighty King forsook their bed for another goddess’s. The Benevolent Queen was so sad that She cried. She cried so much that Her tears fell down to our world and flooded everything.”

“That’s right. It rained for decades, and our ancestors built a great steam ship to carry them through the Benevolent Queen’s tears.”

“The Queen Hildegard!” Aya clapped her hands.

Papa smiled and patted her head. “Yes, Aya. The Queen Hildegard, named after the mortal queen who ruled when the great flood happened.”

Aya scrunched up her face. “But Papa, if the world was all water, why is Desertera so dry?”

“After the Benevolent Queen cried all Her tears, She got mad—so mad that the heat of Her anger dried up the world and made it into a desert.”

“Without water, the ship got stuck on land and became the palace.”

“Exactly.” Papa leaned forward. “Then the Benevolent Queen took the Almighty King’s power and banished Him deep below the desert soil. When She did that, She saw the mortal world had become a desert, and She felt terribly guilty for what She had done to us, Her children. So She appeared to our king and offered to help us.”

“But the world is still desert. Why didn’t She save us?”

“Well, She discovered that our king, just like the Almighty King, was sharing the bed of a woman who wasn’t his queen. This angered the Benevolent Queen, and She cursed the mortals, swearing that we will never again know our beautiful world of water and land until our kings and queens learn honesty and fidelity.”

Aya’s brows furrowed. “But King Archon is good, isn’t he? No one speaks ill of King Archon. He must be good.”

Papa motioned for her to stand and looked her straight in the eyes. “That’s right, Aya. You must never speak ill of King Archon or Prince Lionel or the queen, no matter who holds the title.”

“I won’t, Papa.”

“Good.” Papa smiled and squeezed her shoulders.

Aya pursed her lips and tapped her chin. “Papa?”

“Yes?”

“Why did the Almighty King want a different bed? Was his too stiff?”

Papa chuckled. “Something like that.”

As a result of this belief, that a scorned goddess turned the world to a desert wasteland, adultery is declared one of the vilest crimes in society, punishable by execution.

So, what attracted me, as an author, to this theme? My husband likes to joke that it’s a warning to show exactly what would happen to him if he betrayed me (ha ha)—but really, this law is about so much more than betrayal. The consequences of adultery’s criminalization are far-reaching and destroy lives over physically harmless (though ethically questionable) actions. Moreover, the strict moral codes breed other injustices (like blatant sexism) and even worse crimes (like King Archon orchestrating the executions of his wives). Overall, this theme is my way to comment on the ills I see in our society by showing them in new lights and to encourage my readers to think about the injustices they see.

That, and it makes for a pretty good story, too.

If you’d like to find out if King Archon gets away with framing his wives in adultery, you can enter my Goodreads giveaway for your chance to win one of three signed copies of The Cogsmith’s Daughter, HERE.

Don’t like leaving things to chance? Me either. You can purchase your copy of The Cogsmith’s Daughter at any of these online retailers:

Amazon USAmazon UKAmazon AU, etc.

Barnes & Noble

iBooks

Kobo

Smashwords

WHEN THE STEAM-POWERED WORLD DRIES UP…

Two-hundred years ago, the steam-powered world experienced an apocalyptic flood. unnamed (1)When the waters dried up, the survivors settled around their steamship in a wasteland they named Desertera. Believing the flood and drought were caused by a scorned goddess, the monarchs demanded execution for anyone who commits the unforgivable sin—adultery.

ONE KING RULES WITH ABSOLUTE POWER AND UNQUENCHABLE LUST…

Today, King Archon entraps his wives in the crime of adultery, executing each boring bride to pursue his next infatuation. Most nobles overlook King Archon’s behavior, but when Lord Varick’s daughter falls victim to the king’s schemes, he vows revenge.

UNTIL THE COGSMITH’S DAUGHTER RISKS EVERYTHING FOR VENGEANCE.

When Aya Cogsmith was a young girl, King Archon had her father executed for treason. Orphaned and forced to turn to prostitution for survival, Aya dreams of avenging her father’s death. When Lord Varick approaches Aya with plans for vengeance, she agrees to play the king’s seductress—even though it puts her at risk for execution.

Packed with high-society intrigue, dappled with seduction, and driven by revenge, The Cogsmith’s Daughter is a steampunk dystopian novel with the perfect mixture of conspiracy and romance.

Kate M. Colby is an author of cross-genre fiction and creative nonfiction. Her first unnamed (2)series, Desertera, consists of steampunk dystopian novels with themes of socio-economic disparity, self-empowerment, romance, and revenge. She lives in the United States with her husband and furry children. You can learn more about Kate and her books on her website: www.KateMColby.com.