Calling Indie Horror/Thriller Authors! #IndieAuthors #bookpromo #BadMoonOnTheRise

For the month of October, Books & Such will again be featuring Bad Moon On The Rise, 31 days of horror/thriller writers!  download (5) If you’re an indie author of horror/thriller books, send me your info.  This is your chance for free publicity, to talk up your book, learn about other authors of the same genre, and hopefully sell some books.  Each post will contain any information you’d like to include, such as a book synopsis, author bio, contact links, buy links and a short interview.

Only 3 spots left!  Email me at tpolen6@gmail.com with your name and title of your book and I’ll send you an info sheet within the next week.

I’d appreciate any help in spreading the word about this, so thanks in advance!

Calling Indie Horror/Thriller Authors! #IndieAuthors #bookpromo #BadMoonOnTheRise

For the month of October, Books & Such will again be featuring Bad Moon On The Rise, 31 days of horror/thriller writers!  download (5) If you’re an indie author of horror/thriller books, send me your info.  This is your chance for free publicity, to talk up your book, learn about other authors of the same genre, and hopefully sell some books.  Each post will contain any information you’d like to include, such as a book synopsis, author bio, contact links, buy links and a short interview.

Only 8 spots left!  Email me at tpolen6@gmail.com with your name and title of your book and I’ll send you an info sheet within the next week.

I’d appreciate any help in spreading the word about this, so thanks in advance!

Calling Indie Horror/Thriller Authors! #IndieAuthors #bookpromo #BadMoonOnTheRise

For the month of October, Books & Such will again be featuring Bad Moon On The Rise, 31 days of horror/thriller writers!  download (5) If you’re an indie author of horror/thriller books, send me your info.  This is your chance for free publicity, to talk up your book, learn about other authors of the same genre, and hopefully sell some books.  Each post will contain any information you’d like to include, such as a book synopsis, author bio, contact links, buy links and a short interview.

I’m taking sign-ups starting immediately, so be one of the first 31 people to contact me! Email me at tpolen6@gmail.com with your name and title of your book and I’ll send you an info sheet within the next week.

I’d appreciate any help in spreading the word about this, so thanks in advance!

My Book Is Being Published!

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We interrupt the regularly scheduled Downsizing the TBR Pile post for a special announcement – I’ve signed with an independent publisher and my book is tentatively scheduled for publication December 1st!  I’ve got a lot of work to do between now and then, but I’m hoping some of you can help out with ARCs and reviews in the near future.  As I told my hubby, I’m beyond thrilled and excited, but also have moments when I ask, “What the hell am I getting myself into?”  But then the excitement takes over again and it’s all good.  Drinks are on me!

bad moon on the rise

That being said, the TBR pile downsizing may be a little more sporadic (if that’s even possible), and I’ll also be posting for Bad Moon On The Rise this week, possibly Wednesday.  So if you’re a horror writer, or know someone who is, and would like to be featured on Books & Such during the month of October, stay tuned for the signups later this week.

Downsizing the TBR Pile

Yep – we’re back to downsizing this week.  Which is a good thing because I’ve got several books I need to read for reviews, I’m getting ready to post for participants in Bad Moon on the Rise for the month of October, and there could be some big news on my own book. 18966806 Stay tuned.

I finished Morning Star by Pierce Brown.  This has to be one of my favorite bloodydamn series ever.  Loved this world, the characters, the action – and such a satisfying ending.

Currently reading:

A Darker Shade final for Irene

 

 

 

 

 

Up next:

TBR pile:  99

Read:  1

Bought:  ZERO (figured I did enough damage last week)

Total:  98

#BadMoonOnTheRise Day 31 The Fading by Carole Nomarhas #books #horror

bad moon on the rise

Welcome to the final day of Bad Moon On The Rise and Happy Halloween!  Today brings us Carole Nomarhas and her collection of short stories, The Fading.  So far, I’ve read two of these stories and found them to be wonderfully chilling – excellent storytelling.

 

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The dead came back. All of them.’

Step quietly, my friend, mind the shadows. This way, this way, there’s something I wish for you to see…

The Fading: eleven darkly-twisted tales of fantasy and horror, magic and superstition. Venture into a place where the veil between worlds is wafer-thin, where the dead join the living and the sun never sets. Drive a road of dust and bones that may never end and may take you places you do not wish to go… Visit a picture-perfect house, in a picture-perfect village, where there is a very special box. Sit for a while on the front porch, and wait for the end of the world, unless something more terrifying comes calling first…

Carole Nomarhas delivers a unique blend of dread and intrigue in short stories that cross genres and lead the reader down paths that were once the familiar haunts of horror and fantasy readers alike. With a delicate brush she paints vivid worlds where serial killers dwell, and digs up past wrong-deeds with dire consequences. Each story is a delicately-woven tapestry of nightmare places and nightmare beings, ordinary folk in extraordinary situations.
Step quietly, mind the shadows, and I will see you on the other side…

How long have you been writing horror/thrillers and what drew you to the genre?

I’ve loved horror as long as I can remember, be it fiction or movies. Mostly I write short stories and they usually fall somewhere on the spec fic spectrum, be it SF, fantasy or horror.

How did you come up with the idea for your book?

I came back from a long hiatus from fiction, and the first thing I wrote was a horror story, and then another, and then another…  So I decided to add these new works to a collection including previously published work. I also had some ‘limbo’ stories. These were stories that had been accepted, but not paid for – small press, what can I say? There were a couple of stories I had no idea whether they had actually been published. The presses disappeared, but I didn’t know whether the story had been published or not before they folded, and so couldn’t in good faith submit them elsewhere.

So The Fading became a collection of new work, reprints, and my possibly unpublished ‘orphans’.

If you could erase one horror cliché, what would it be?

Vampires. I suspect I’m allergic to them.

What are you working on now?

Short stories, as usual, of various persuasions,  though I’m revisiting a YA fantasy novel.

Favorite horror movie and book?

Hard, hard question.  Firstly, is Jaws a horror movie? Well, I’m an Aussie, so for me sharks are the ultimate horror. Spiders and snakes? I don’t care about those.  Sharks scare me silly, and Jaws is such a perfect movie anyway.  As for fiction, really hard to narrow it down. However, for purely sentimental reasons Salem’s Lot, the first Stephen King novel I ever read.

Author bio

Carole Nomarhas lives in a tiny village in New South Wales, Australia, where the main amenities are a pub and…  well, that’s pretty much it. She has three very strange rescue dogs, two demented rescue cats, and is married to the most patient man on the planet.

Her stories, which fall within the genres of science fiction, fantasy and horror, have been appearing in print and online for many years.

After taking a long hiatus from writing fiction, she has returned to her first loves: horror and dark fantasy.

Where to find Carole

Goodreads
Glass City Books
Co-operative Ink
Email carole@glasscitybooks.com
Facebook

Buy links

Amazon US
Amazon Australia
Amazon UK

#BadMoonOnTheRise Day 30 Rotter Apocalypse by Scott M. Baker @vampire_hunters #books #zombies

bad moon on the rise

Welcome Scott M. Baker!  Today is release day for his book, Rotter Apocalypse!

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The zombie apocalypse is about to reach its inevitable conclusion, but not before it unleashes a few more nightmares on Natalie Barzagan, Mike Robson, and Windows.

After breaking away from the rest of the group, Natalie and her Angels succeeded in getting the vaccine to the government-in-exile in San Francisco where Natalie joins the military effort to clear the West Coast of the living dead.

Robson destroyed the rape camp that had kidnapped Windows, but not until after she had escaped. Along with the remaining vampires and a band of camp stragglers, he sets off to build a new compound.

Windows and the ten-year-old girl she rescued from the camp are taken in by a kindly widower who gives them the opportunity to start over and heal their wounds, emotional and physical.

Just as Natalie, Robson, and Windows are settling into their new lives, each will be confronted with a final life or death decision that will decide their fates.

How long have you been writing horror/thrillers and what drew you to the genre? 

I’ve been writing horror since 2003 when I began The Vampire Hunters trilogy and published my first zombie-related short stories—“Rednecks Shouldn’t Play with Dead Things” and “Cruise of the Living Dead.” I’ve been working on the Rotter World trilogy, which concludes with Rotter Apocalypse coming out on 30 October, since 2010.

This is not the first genre I’ve written in. I worked for the CIA for twenty-three years so, when I first started back in the 1990s, my first books were about espionage. The first two manuscripts were amateurish and mediocre, and I never got them published, although I did hone my craft while working on them. The third book was a techno-thriller about North Korea acquiring nuclear weapons and blackmailing the United States. I had an agent and several New York publishers interested in purchasing the book; however, after the terrorist attack on 11 September, the market for that genre dried up overnight.

Switching genres was easy for me. I’m a Monster Kid from the 1960s/1970s. You know the geeky type. I had a stack of Famous Monsters of Filmland in my desk drawer, all the Aurora monster models on display, and a poster of Godzilla on the wall right beside Farrah Fawcett in a bathing suit. Making the transition into horror also gave me more freedom. When writing espionage and techno-thrillers, I had to follow certain guidelines and keep the plots feasible. I don’t have to worry about those same restrictions with horror, and I’ve had fun with it. Over the years, I’ve launched a vampire apocalypse in Washington D.C., had an alcoholic mall Santa battle zombie reindeer, and terrorized New Mexico and Florida with giant insects. I’m not even close to being finished yet.

How did you come up with the idea for your book? 

Coming up with the concept for the first book in the trilogy, Rotter World, was difficult because I wanted to provide an aspect on the story not found in every other zombie novel. I eventually settled on a plot involving vampires releasing a government-created Zombie Virus on mankind, only to have the living dead eat their way through both human and vampire species. A small group of humans and vampires who made it through the outbreak have put aside their differences and joined together in order to ride out the apocalypse. The détente lasts for several months until the doctor who created the Zombie Virus shows up at their camp and claims he has a vaccine that will nullify the outbreak, but it’s located in an underground military facility half way down the East coast. This small band that barely trusts each other now embarks on a road trip from Hell.

[SPOILER ALERT] In the sequel, Rotter Nation, the group returns to their base camp with the vaccine, only to find that the camp has been destroyed by a rape gang and everyone (except for one woman taken hostage) has been murdered. They split into two: one group travels west across a zombie-devastated country to bring the vaccine to the government-in-exile in Omaha, and the second attempts to rescue their friend from the rape gang. [END SPOILER ALERT]

For Rotter Apocalypse, I wanted to do something that is not frequently done in the genre, which is to show the final battles between humans and zombies. This is my favorite book in the series, and not because I cranked up the body count and gore to an all-time high. In a lot of the novels and films in this genre, the main characters fight until they’re eventually over run by the living dead. In Rotter Apocalypse, I explore how the survivors would reorganize and take the war to the living dead. The novel is violent, graphic, and depressing—which is exactly the feel I was going for.

If you could erase one horror cliché, what would it be? 

There’s once cliché in horror that I’ve always hated (although it’s mostly confined to film), and that is the female character being a helpless, screaming victim. Thankfully, it’s a cliché that has been correcting itself over the past fifteen years. It’s the main reason I find it hard to enjoy slasher movies. Yes, there will be women (and men) who will fold under pressure in a horror situation, but they’re the exception, not the norm. In my vampire and zombie trilogy I have several characters that are weak, cowardly, and easily manipulated; it wouldn’t be realistic without them. However, I include strong female protagonists in every one of my books. If I have to battle aliens or the living dead, I want Ripley and Alice by my side.

What are you working on now?

I’m working on two projects that I’m very excited about. The first is a series of young adult novels set in a post-apocalyptic world in which a failed anti-matter experiment renders the world’s electronic devices useless and opens several portals between Hell and Earth, allowing hordes of demons to pass through into our realm. The story focuses on a small group of survivors who have figured out a way to reverse the process and travel around the world to close the portals. The second is an adult-oriented series that takes place during World War II and pits Allied intelligence officers against Nazi Germany, which is waging a secret occult war against the West. I received my Master’s Degree in modern German and Soviet Studies, and am a huge history aficionado, so this is a project I’ve been planning for years.

Of course, this doesn’t mean I’m done with zombies. I’m working with a close friend to flesh out (pun intended) a concept about a U.S. covert operation that uses programmed zombies as weapons, a project which of course goes FUBAR and leads to the inevitable apocalyptic consequences. Think of it as a cross between Night of the Living Dead and Zero Dark Thirty.

Favorite horror movie and book? 

Only one? That’s like asking me to choose who is my favorite child.

Favorite zombie book: World War Z by Max Brooks. I loved the way that he breathed new life into the genre (again, pun intended) by covering the zombie apocalypse from the initial outbreak to the end of the war, and doing it an oral history format.

Favorite zombie movie: Resident Evil. It’s the combination of setting, building tension, and kick-ass action that makes this my favorite zombie movie. If I stumble across this movie while flipping through the TV channels before going to bed, I’m watching it no matter how late it is.

Author bio

Scott M. Baker was born and raised in Everett, Massachusetts and spent twenty-three years in northern Virginia unnamed (24)working for the Central Intelligence Agency. Scott is now retired and lives in Gainesville, Florida as a full-time writer along with his wife and fellow author Alison Beightol and his stepdaughter. He has written Rotter World, Rotter Nation, and Rotter Apocalypse, his post-apocalyptic zombie trilogy; Yeitso, his homage to the giant monster movies of the 1950s that he loved watching as a kid; The Vampire Hunters trilogy, about humans fighting the undead in Washington D.C.; as well as the novella Nazi Ghouls from Space (the title says it all). He is currently working on a series of young adult post-apocalyptic novels and a second series about Allied intelligence officers fighting Nazi occultism in World War II.

Scott has also authored several short stories, including “Cruise of the Living Dead” (a zombie outbreak aboard a cruise ship), “Deck the Malls with Bowels of Holly” (an alcoholic mall Santa battles zombie reindeer), “Last Flight of the Bismarck” (steampunk zombies), “The Hunger” (cannibalism during a zombie apocalypse), “Lebenden Toten at the Gate” (Nazis versus zombies at Stalingrad), “From Space It Came” (a giant spider from space), and the novella Dead Water.

When not writing, Scott can usually be found doting on the two boxers and two cats that kindly allow him to live with them.

Where to find Scott
Blog
Facebook
Twitter: @vampire_hunters
Pinterest

Buy link
Amazon

 

 

 

#BadMoonOnTheRise Day 29 Raising Hell by Phillip T. Stephens @Stephens_PT #books #darkhumor

bad moon on the rise

Welcome Phillip T. Stephens whose book, Raising Hell, offers a more humorous side of horror!

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A clueless optimist ruins a perfectly good hell.

Pity poor Lucifer. He rules hell with a vice grip. Demons and damned scatter at the sound of his steps. The Supreme Butt In hasn’t pestered him in eons. His future looks perfect, pitch black, until an administrative error sticks him with an innocent soul—an overweight optimist who calls himself Pilgrim and who believes he must be in hell to do good.

Lucifer never considers sending him back. Why waste a second chance to corrupt an innocent soul? He orders his subordinates to torture, degrade and humiliate Pilgrim until he promises to become evil if only it will ease the pain. Unfortunately, Pilgrim makes the best of the worst possible experiences. Always polite and well-mannered, he makes Pollyanna seem like a prophet of doom. Even worse, the damned start catching on, and set about making hell into the most enjoyable place of everlasting torment ever.

Lucifer can’t let Pilgrim continue to wreak happiness, but he can’t send him back untainted, either. When God arrives with a deadline for Pilgrim’s return, he enlists fellow fallen angels Screwtape, Azazel and the gender morphing Mephistopheles in a plot to corrupt Pilgrim’s soul before the deadline expires.

How long have you been writing horror/thrillers and what drew you to the genre?

This was the first book I published, although I have another horror novel I will probably release in the spring and an earlier one I wrote in the eighties that may or may not see the light of day. I’ve loved horror stories since I was a kid. My dad was a Baptist minister and wouldn’t let me watch the late night creature features like the other kids, but I traded the cards with the other kids.

Then I found a copy of Frankenstein in the school library in third grade. It had a picture of a hanging woman with her breast exposed. I made the mistake of showing it, in confidence, to a friend who ratted me out. Even though the book was in the school library I was the one who got in trouble. But boy did I love horror and reading forbidden books after that.

How did you come up with the idea for your book?

The idea came to me when I was transitioning between two educational jobs, both of which required me to answer to multiple managers, all of whom loved to micromanage. I thought, this feels more like hell with brimstone and fire. Any one of the managers could have been Lucifer. So I pictured this poor guy trapped in a soulless bureaucracy, and the novel came easy. The ten or so rewrites until I was happy with it, however, demanded my attention for several years.

If you could erase one horror cliché, what would it be?

Horror is cliché. The cliché I would erase is another fan’s treasure. I’m probably most tired of the women dropping their drawers for any sexy vampire or werewolf motif, but that’s because my generation included a generation of women who would never be sucked into a life of sexual co-dependency (so to speak). That motif spawned an entire PNR sub-genre so erasing that cliché would wipe out an industry and raise the objection that it’s no cliché.

What are you working on now?

I’m getting ready to release a young adult novel, Seeing Jesus, about a girl who sees a homeless man no one else can see. It’s about as far from a horror novel as a novel can get. Then, in the spring I will release Scent, a horror novel in which the supernatural world needs to be protected from us.

Favorite horror movie and book?

Movie: Ghost Story (John Irvin, 1981). Book: Lovecraft, At the Mountains of Madness. (It doesn’t get more pulp, but it’s like cotton candy for the brain.)

Author bio

Phillip T. Stephens appears once a year, on Halloween, on the sidewalk of his broken down, rescue cat infested three-story ranch-style duplex in the middle of a forest thick with Central Texas mesquite (where children wander their way up a trail lit by luminarias* to find the crusty old curmudgeon rumored to wait at the end) dressed in bloody bandages and spider webs with waist-length vermin infested beard and riding a broken down wheel chair, brandishing a shotgun on his lap. He rewards the children who make it to the threshold without running away in terror with a kind word and a copy of his book, which sucks for them because the last thing they want on Halloween is a shitty book. They want more candy.

======================

*A Hispanic tradition, paper bags with candles inside.

Where to find Phillip
Website
Twitter: @stephens_pt
Goodreads

Buy links
Amazon
Createspace

#BadMoonOnTheRise Day 28 Hell Is Coming (Watchers #1) by N.P. Martin @NPMartinAuthor #books #fantasyhorror

bad moon on the rise

Day 28 brings us N.P. Martin!  Hell Is Coming is the first in a series and is currently FREE!

 

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Leia Swanson has always believed in monsters, especially after one killed her parents when she was seven years old.

Now eighteen, Leia is being forced to confront those same monsters when they suddenly become part of her every day existence. Her life now turned upside down, she is drawn into a world of demons and the supernatural, where she must learn to fight for her life.

With help from an Uncle she never knew existed—one who harbours a dark secret concerning her mother—Leia must learn the ways of the Watcher’s, an underground group tasked with controlling the dark supernatural forces that threaten to destroy the world of humans. To become what she needs to be, Leia must put her life and very soul on the line, forever changing who and what she is.

Hell is coming for Leia Swanson—and she must do more than just survive to keep her soul.

How long have you been writing horror/thrillers and what drew you to the genre?

I have been writing some kind of horror since I first started writing as a teenager. The first novel I ever read was Salem’s Lot by Stephen King, which then opened the door to a whole slew of other horror novels that I devoured over the coming years, novels by the likes of Clive Barker, James Herbert, Shaun Hutson, Ramsey Campbell and many more. I also love to watch movies and TV shows in the genre, so I’m very familiar with it, as well as being in love with all things dark and sinister.  So when I came to start writing seriously a few years ago, the horror/supernatural genre was the obvious choice for me to write in since I know and love it so well. There is just so much you can do it in it. As a genre, horror offers a writer quite a bit of scope to write any kind of story they wish.

How did you come up with the idea for your book?

When I decided to write seriously, I looked at the market to see what was selling and what wasn’t, but staying within my interests. So I ended up choosing the dark fantasy horror genre to write in, since it seemed to encompass what I was already interested in as a writer, as well as offer good commercial potential, which is something you definitely have to consider if you want to make a living!

I also love TV shows like Supernatural and Grimm, so I drew inspiration from those shows as well. My influences are obvious in the first book I wrote, Hell Is Coming, the first book in my Watchers series. By the time I wrote the second and third books in the series, I had found my own voice and the story became something unique and original. The last two books are actually set in Hell, so for a horror writer, that was a lot of fun to play around in.

I also wanted to create a strong female character for the series, which I did with Leia Swanson. I enjoy writing female characters more than I do male characters. I don’t know why, I just find them more interesting. The eventual story in the books then stemmed from that character.

If you could erase one horror cliché, what would it be?

Zombies! A bit overdone these days, I think.

What are you working on now?

I have almost finished writing a novella about a side character in my Watchers series, Lucas the demon. It will be called, Lucas: Origins Of A Demon. As the title  suggests, the book will describe his background, where he came from, how he became a demon etc. It’s fun expanding on characters like that, and interesting to find out more about them.

Favorite horror movie and book?

My favourite horror novel isn’t really classed as a horror novel, but it’s American Psycho. I just love that book, it’s a masterpiece. In a more traditional horror sense, maybe Salem’s Lot as it started me on this road in the first place.

Favourite horror movie is “Alien”. Again, not straight out horror, but more frightening than most of the full on horror movies I’ve watched. For full on horror, I’d have to say “Evil Dead 2”. No explanation needed on that one!

Author bio

N.P. Martin is the author of dark and urban fantasy novels. He is the creator of the Watchers series, a number of unnamed (21)short stories and various bestselling non-fiction books on self defense and martial arts.

He is enjoying his current foray into the fictional darkness, so much so that he intends to do it until he dies, after which he will spend the afterlife gathering material for a series he has planned when he eventually comes back.

Where to find N.P.

Website
Facebook
Twitter: @NPMartinAuthor
Newsletter

Buy links

Hell Is Coming is FREE

Amazon
Apple
Google Play
Kobo

 

#BadMoonOnTheRise Day 27 Come Hell or High Water (The Complete Trilogy) by Stephen Morris @StephenNYC1 #books #OccultThriller #witches

bad moon on the rise

Today we welcome Stephen Morris!  If you like some history interwoven with your horror/occult thrillers, this is your kind of book!

 

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Witchcraft! Ghosts! Vampires! Tarot cards!
An old crone is bound to a stake in the Old Town Square of Prague and consumed by flames in 1356, her vengeful words setting in motion a series of dark events that unfold across the centuries, culminating in the historic flood of August 2002 that threatens to destroy the city.

In the summer of 2002, two academics attending a conference at the university – a Jesuit priest and a beautiful Irish professor (who is also a voracious Irish vampire, known as the Dearg-due) – develop their own nefarious agendas. To access the enormous potential power to which the dead witch holds the key, they dupe a secretary into helping destroy the city by unravelling the protective magic built into the Charles Bridge itself that has defended the city since its construction. A small group of academics at that same university conference discover the threat and are forced by circumstances to practice the folk magic they have previously merely researched. Drawing on the power of the Tarot, always especially associated with Prague, they battle the Jesuit, the Dearg-due, the unwitting secretary and the forces of evil that threaten to destroy the city. The academics realize that once free, these forces will unleash a dark power that could undermine all of western civilization. The final confrontation occurs as the historic flood of Prague in 2002 is conjured to destroy the magical Charles Bridge which has protected the city for centuries.

The novel alternates chapters set in medieval Prague and contemporary Prague (summer 2002). The chapters set in 1356-1357 incorporate a number of local Prague folktales and legends. These 1356 events alert Nadezhda that something very wrong indeed is afoot in Prague. Together with an elderly rabbi from Prague’s famous Jewish Quarter, she sets out to avert the impending disaster.

How long have you been writing horror/thrillers and what drew you to the genre?

I have always been fascinated by black magic and the misuse of power – my first true love was the Wicked Witch of the West in “The Wizard of Oz!” The bad guys – especially the supernatural bad guys – were always the most interesting characters and seemed to have the most fun. In high school, I toyed with the idea of writing an epic that followed a particular family of wicked people who would eventually produce the Antichrist but I have yet to write that book. Occult thrillers are now my favorite reading – I’m always looking for another great book or series or author to add to my Kindle!

How did you come up with the idea for your book?

I was reading a history of medieval monastic curses against the nobility who would attempt to encroach on monastic land or privileges and as I read one of the cursing prayers, I immediately saw a witch being burned using those same words to curse the mob who had brought her to the stake. I also visited and fell in love with Prague and discovered several Czech legends that could easily be seen as the result of some of those curses. As my friend Rob and I were standing on the Charles Bridge at sunset when spring evening, he said, “You know everything about medieval theology and witchcraft and Prague history and legends; you should do something with it!” In that moment, it all clicked and I knew immediately what the story of COME HELL OR HIGH WATER would be.

If you could erase one horror cliché, what would it be?

Do the good guys ALWAYS have to win?!?!

What are you working on now?

I’m working on a novel about an Estonian werewolf who flees his homeland in 1890 to find someone who can free him from the wolf-magic that he has lost control of. He makes his way from Estonia through Latvia to Lithuania and Poland. He finally reaches Prague and hopes to find a “cunning man” or a “wise woman” to free him from the curse he has brought upon himself, but he only seems to find frauds and charlatans – poor Alexei!

Favorite horror movie and book?

It may sound cheesy but the 1970s made-for-tv movie CROWHAVEN FARM still gives me the shivers! I think Kate Griffin’s MIDNIGHT MAYOR series are the best occult thrillers available and her MAGICALS ANONYMOUS series are the best books with a slightly more light-hearted take on that same material.

Author bio

Stephen has degrees in medieval history and theology from Yale and St. Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Academy. A former priest, he served as the Eastern Orthodox chaplain at Columbia University. His previous academic writing has dealt primarily with Late Antiquity and Byzantine church life.

He is also the Chair of the CORE Executive of Inter-disciplinary.net and organizes annual conferences on aspects of the supernatural, evil and wickedness, and related subjects. It was an I-D.net project that took him to Prague for the first time in 2001 and he immediately fell in love with the city! He has been back many, MANY times!

Stephen, a Seattle native, is now a long-time New York resident and currently lives in Manhattan with his partner, Elliot.

This occult thriller explores the legends of medieval and modern Prague. Magdalena, a bored administrative assistant in Prague, discovers the ghost of Fen’ka, an old woman burned alive as a witch in 1356, and agrees to help her pursue justice. Magdalena becomes more and more involved with the occult: She communicates with the spirit of Madame de Thebes, a fortuneteller murdered by the Nazis, and seeks out powerful demons to aid Fen’ka. Her story is interwoven with the novel’s strongest chapters, set in medieval Prague, which dramatize the effects of Fen’ka’s last dying curseon the city. Well-versed in 14th-century Prague, Morris draws heavily on folk legends to create a window into the lives of characters from various walks of life, including righteous priests, wealthy merchants and budding thieves. Each self-contained medieval chapter builds tension fairly well; the chapters set in modern times…. culminate with powerful demons let loose in Prague and the development of a compelling theme regarding Magdalena’s temptation to gain power and the price she’s willing to pay for it. Although the dialogue could use more subtlety… the plot and portrait of the 14th century are gripping enough to keep readers engaged…. (From Kirkus Reviews)

” As eloquently told as it is informative and thought-provoking, ‘Wellspring’ is a title worthy of standing on the shelf alongside acclaimed works such as those in The Vampire Chronicles and Mayfair Witches series penned by the mother of all things occult, Anne Rice.” – Red City Review

“Well-versed in 14th-century Prague, Morris draws heavily on folk legends to create a window into the lives of characters from various walks of life, including righteous priests, wealthy merchants and budding thieves.” – Kirkus Reviews

This supernatural suspense… is the beginning of a trilogy that has the potential to be a genre-transcendent epic a la Deborah Harkness’ bestselling All Souls trilogy (A Discovery of Witches, et al.) — Blue Ink Review

This is a book that you just do not want to put down! It is all about the past, and how the energy from the past lives on in the present…. This is a well researched book, from the point of view of medieval history, the Tarot itself, occult practices, the church, and the psyche behind what motivates people to act as they do. — Perspectives on Tarot

“Morris generates some genuine chills and thrills in this entertaining series opener that alternates between the 14th and 21st centuries…. The author’s background in medieval history stands him in good stead in the 14th-century sections, as he slips in interesting details to help make the fantastic plausible.” – Publishers Weekly

“…Out of the many characters we meet, Father Conrad is a standout. The priest who instigates Fen’ka’s burning and is to blame for another death in the book, rises from hand-rubbing villainy to something far more clever. You sympathize with his passions, and his ultimate fate is perhaps one of the book’s best moments…. A well-crafted yarn, which takes you deep into the year 1325, mysticism, religion, and pagan rites in a quaint Prague town, COME HELL OR HIGH WATER, PART ONE: WELLSPRING is an epic journey worth taking.” — Indie Reader Discovery Awards

Where to find Stephen

Please see Stephen’s website for more information on upcoming novels and his most recent blog posts:
www.stephenmorrisauthor.com

You can also reach him at nycstephen12@yahoo.com

Twitter: @StephenNYC1

Buy links

Amazon