Resurrection (Immortal Soulless #1) by Tanith Frost #TuesdayBookBlog #paranormal #thriller @TanithFrost

Her gifts will be her salvation… or her downfall.

No one gave Aviva a choice about becoming a monster. Since the night of her murder she’s been forced to accept a new reality—burned by sunlight, dependent on the blood of the living, searching for her place in a dark world she didn’t believe existed until she awoke as a vampire.

She’s still struggling to accept her fate and master her dark powers when the news arrives: rogue vampires are torturing and killing human residents of the city, threatening the secrecy and uneasy peace of the supernatural world.

As the hunt begins, Aviva’s deliciously distracting trainer, Daniel, helps her seek out her unique strengths. The gifts she discovers are shameful in the eyes of vampire society—and they may be the only thing standing between a pack of ruthless paranormal killers and the unsuspecting humans they prey on. – Goodreads.com

I haven’t read any vampire books since the Twilight Series, even though a glut of them were released during that time, most varying shades of the same story.  Tanith Frost has managed to pen an original vampire tale and a world that will suck (pun totally intended) you in.  No sparkly vamps here, folks.

Resurrection introduces us to Aviva, a complex, young vampire who had no say in the matter when she was created.  She struggles with what and who she is and what’s expected of her in this new life and is only beginning to understand her power.  This is a hierarchical and organized vampire world – vamps aren’t permitted to run rampant and feed on the general population, but things aren’t always as they seem, and that’s something I enjoyed about this book.  There’s a bit of a mystery, as a rogue group of vamps have taken matters into their own hands and Aviva is among those charged with tracking them down.  The supporting characters are all well-drawn and I especially look forward to learning more about mysterious Daniel.

With mystery, suspense, and a touch of romance, Resurrection is a dark, enticing, original read I’d highly recommend to paranormal fans or readers looking for a new take on vampires.

I received a digital ARC from the author.

Indie Author Friday: Rebecca Howie #IndieAuthor #YA #mystery #thriller @RebeccaH2016

It’s Friday!  Today’s indie author is Rebecca Howie, with her YA mystery, The Game Begins.  If Rebecca or I turn up missing, you’ll be able to find us either at Hogwarts or on a desert island reading the Harry Potter Series.

It’s been four years since the car crash took away her father and Sam Beckett’s nightmares are back with a vengeance.

When her friend suggests she take a PI course to distract herself, Sam agrees, but she soon realises it won’t be as simple as she expected when her first case leads to a woman being killed, her husband accused of her murder, and a series of threatening text messages sent to her phone which lead Sam to believe that her father’s crash might not be the accident everyone thought it was.

What’s the most constructive criticism you’ve been given in your writing career?

I know it’s simple, but ‘start a new paragraph every time a character starts talking’ would probably be the answer to this question. I used to publish stuff on Archive Of Our Own and I’ve received a lot of great tips and advice on it over the years, but the paragraph one was definitely the most constructive. It’s stayed with me, and although getting criticism stung a bit, it helped me improve as a writer and I’m always all for that.

If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?

I always wanted to be a writer when I was younger, but when I asked a few people what they thought of that, they told me writers didn’t make any money because it all went to publishers and agents and editors, and somehow, I was more sensible as a child and knew you needed money to survive, so I dismissed writing as a possible future career. But self-publishing is popular now and easily accessible, so I’d tell my younger self that in a few years, you can publish a book in a matter of minutes, and to keep all the ideas she gets in the middle of the nights because some of them could become someone’s favourite book one day.

What do you love most about the writing process?

I love all of it (except from the doubts that creep up on you when you read someone else’s work and start comparing it to your own) but my favourite part is when an idea comes out of nowhere and shakes everything up.

What’s the last thing you watched on TV/Netflix?

Castle, even though I’d told myself I wasn’t going to watch it anymore because I start using Americanisms in my writing and adding ‘ass’ onto everything.

Book you’d want with you if you were stranded on a desert island?

I’d want the Harry Potter series with me, The Hunger Games, Divergent, and a blank notepad to write my own.

If you could be any character in fiction, who would you be?

I’d want to be extra in Harry Potter. Who doesn’t want to live at Hogwarts?

Author Bio:

Rebecca Howie is a procrastinating writer from Scotland, who prefers spending her time in fictional worlds rather than the real one. Her first book, The Game Begins, was released in February 2016, and reached 2nd in the Teen and Young Adult Detective category on Amazon.

Social Media Links:

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/THEGAMEBEGINS16/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rebeccah2016/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/rebeccah2016
Wordpress: https://rebeccahowiebooks.wordpress.com/

Buy links:

Amazon
Apple
Barnes & Noble
Createspace
Inkterra
Kobo
Scribd

 

Blight by Alexandra Duncan #bookreview #dystopian

Seventeen-year-old Tempest Torres has lived on the AgraStar farm north of Atlanta since she was found outside the gates at the age of five. Now she’s part of the security force guarding the fence and watching for scavengers—people who would rather steal genetically engineered food from the company than work for it. When a group of such rebels accidentally sets off an explosion in the research compound, it releases into the air a blight that kills every living thing in its path—including humans. With blight-resistant seeds in her pocket, Tempest teams up with a scavenger boy named Alder and runs for help. But when they finally arrive at AgraStar headquarters, they discover that there’s an even bigger plot behind the blight—and it’s up to them to stop it from happening again. A fast-paced action-adventure story that is Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake meets Nancy Farmer’s House of the Scorpion. – Goodreads.com

In hindsight, have you ever wondered what would have happened if you’d taken a left instead of right, left a little earlier, or chosen the blue pill instead of the red?  That’s what security guard Tempest Torres does when her hesitation to take a shot on scavengers results in a domino effect that irrevocably changes not only her life, but her world and the lives of thousands or even millions.

I fell right into this dystopian novel from the first page (I have a weakness for stories involving anything genetically engineered) and the world-building with the author’s take on the ‘haves’ and ‘have-nots’ fascinated me.  Excellent character development with Tempest and Alder – they’re fully-fleshed and well-rounded and the lack of romance/insta-love is a refreshing change, proving not every YA novel needs a romantic element to make an interesting read or complete a story.

Although Tempest is fantastic at the physical and strategic aspects of her job, she seems a little slow in connecting the dots upon discovering certain information and for several pages I wondered how long it would take to sink in.  Blight is supposedly a standalone, but I felt as if some questions were left unanswered at the end, leaving me a little puzzled.

If the author chooses to continue this story, I’d definitely be interested in reading more and I’d recommend Blight to fans of YA dystopia looking for an original story.  Blight is scheduled for publication August 1st, 2017.

Thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for the digital ARC.

Project Cain by Geoffrey Girard #bookreview #YA #thriller @Geoffrey_Girard

Sixteen-year-old Jeff Jacobson had never heard of Jeffrey Dahmer, the infamous serial killer who brutally murderered seventeen people more than twenty years ago. But then Jeff discovers he was constructed in a laboratory only eight years ago, part of a top-secret government cloning experiment called Project CAIN. And scientists created him entirely from Jeffrey Dahmer’s DNA.

Jeff isn’t the only teenage serial-killer clone. Others have been genetically engineered using the DNA of the Son of Sam, the Boston Strangler, and Ted Bundy. Some clones were raised, like Jeff, in caring family environments; others within homes that mimicked the horrific early lives of the serial killers they were created from.

When the most dangerous of the boys are set free, the summer of killing begins. Worse, they hold a secret weapon even more deadly than the terrible evil they carry within.

Can Jeff help catch the “monsters” before becoming one himself? – Goodreads.com

Project Cain is a companion novel to Cain’s Blood (my review), one of the darkest and gripping thrillers I’ve read to date.  The companion novel concept is interesting in that Cain’s Blood is an adult thriller, but Project Cain is intended to be 16-year-old Jeff Jacobsen’s (Jeffrey Dahmer clone) journalized version of events, and is considered YA.  They could be stand alones, but I’d strongly recommend reading Cain’s Blood first.

Much of this story is based on the duel between nature versus nurture, and this is a question young Jeff ponders throughout the story, all the while knowing who and what he is.  His internal struggle is heartbreaking at times, as he wrestles with what he knows to be right and the monster others expect him to be.  He even questions his own sanity, and it’s a mighty heavy load for a 16-year-old to bear.  The reader may even be conflicted about their own feelings toward Jeff, knowing who he is – which makes it an even better read.

This book has received several negative reviews in regards to the lack of dialogue and quotation marks, and telling instead of showing.  The author states at the end of the book that “Project Cain is meant as a journal written by Jeff Jacobson a couple of months after the incidents of the story, and I simply don’t believe he’d use quotation marks in such a journal.”  I completely agree.  Do you use quotation marks when journaling?  I don’t, and seriously doubt a 16-year-old boy would either.

Project Cain made me question my beliefs about nature vs. nurture.  It explores the inner workings of the mind of a sociopath, shows how he perceives the world, and tells the story of a teenage boy’s struggle to figure out who and what he is.  A compelling concept and an enthralling read.

 

 

Interview at Jessica Scott’s Blog #horror #YA

Author Jessica Scott is interviewing me today on her blog.  Sarah is the biweekly selection of the Indie Eden Book Club, run by Jessica. 

While you’re there, stick around and check out her books.  Jessica’s debut novel, Chase and Charlie, was published by Black Rose Writing on May 28, 2015, and her second novel, Portrait of a Sunset, was released on October 28, 2016.

You can find Jessica on social media at the following places:

Facebook
Twitter
Goodreads
Amazon 
Wattpad

Jessica also runs a book club on Facebook called Indie Eden, which is devoted to reading books by indie and self-published authors.

Indie Author Friday: Patricia Harris #IndieAuthor #poetry @pattimouse

Today’s Indie Author is Patricia Harris, a multi-genre author.  Her featured book is a collection of poetry, but also writes children’s books, horror, and YA.

A volume of poetry mostly inspired by prompts.

What do you wish you’d known before you were published?

I wish I had known that self publishing was available sooner. I spent so much time anxious about it. If I had known I could do it myself then I wouldn’t have worried.

What are your favorite books in your genre?

I write in multiple genres. My favorite kid’s book is probably Goodnight Moon By Margaret Wise. My favorite poetry is I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings By Maya Angelou. My favorite horror novel is Salem’s Lot By Steven King. My favorite YA book is Alanna the first adventure by Tamora Pierce.

What character in your book are you least likely to get along with?

In Death of Neverland my character of Wendy. She just felt like someone I could never get along with. In the Current one I am writing….Well I think that Lizzie would be the one who would grate on me the most. She is all brains and logic. In my kid’s book there was no character that I did not like.

What do you love most about the writing process?

Seeing the story evolve. I tend to not plan my stories. I read as I write. So I get to see where the stories are going that way.

How do you think you’ve evolved creatively?

I get that many people are always evolving in their creativity, and that writing helps it to do so. For me though writing has always been a part of me. Publishing however has allowed me to free myself to allow all of my creativity to flow.

What’s your favorite kind of cookie and why?

Peanut butter kisses. My mom used to make them when I was a child. It was something that felt like we were closer when it was done.

Any unusual talents or hobbies?

I have so many hobbies. I crotchet, make jewelry, draw, write poetry and stories, Program in C#, Do digital art, and bake.

What’s the last thing you watched on TV/Netflix?

Bleach(for the fiftieth time)

Who would win a fight between Spiderman and Batman?

Batman because Spiderman is more impulsive.

Book you’d want with you if you were stranded on a desert island?

How to survive on a desert island.

How would your best friend describe you?

Crazy as hell and fragile(he has always seen me as fragile)

If you were an animated character, who would you be and why?

Harley Quinn. Crazy with a heart of gold. But strong enough to decide to be unique.

If you could be any character in fiction, who would you be?

Dawn (from the comics)

Author BioPatricia Harris

Patricia Harris writes children’s books and Poetry. She also writes as Serena Mossgraves, writing horror and more adult stories. She is a Mom and a crafter, Selling jewelry and art as Serenity studios. She has a blog where she writes whatever comes to mind. She enjoys creating art of all sorts. She currently has seven poetry volumes and three children’s books out. As Serena she has a horror novella out with expectation of a novel before the end of the year.

Links

amazon.com/author/harrispatricia

amazon.com/author/serenitysfall

Twitter.com/pattimouse

Twitter.com/serenitysfall

pattimouse.wordpress.com

Out and About (Cathedral Lake Series #2) by Staci Troilo #TuesdayBookBlog #bookreview #suspense

Freedom From Jail… Freedom From Family.

Jensen Keller covets freedom. He’s abided by his father’s wishes for years, until the one time he rebelled, and it nearly lost him his family. Now he’s summoned back to Cathedral Lake only to discover freedom has been granted to the one person who should be denied it—Wade Unger, the man responsible for his sister’s death.

Bella Perish wants nothing more than to be free from her domineering father. In an unexpected turn of events, she’s not only granted that freedom—autonomy is forced on her… at the cost of her budding relationship with Jensen. As she works to repair the relationships that matter most to her, her newfound independence is compromised. Worse, her very life is threatened.

An account of repression, revelation, bravery, and contrition, Out and About chronicles the merits and miseries of freedoms denied and gained. – Goodreads.com

Several years have passed since the first book in this series, Type and Cross, and Out and About continues with the Keller family, focusing more on Jensen.  This book could work as a standalone – however, I’d recommend reading the first.

This author knows how to craft a story, revealing tidbits of a secret on one page, a dramatic twist a few chapters later, subtle hints of what’s to come – everything that makes a reader say, “Just one more chapter and then I’ll sleep/do laundry/feed the cat, etc.”  And the conflict!  The challenging family dynamics in this story – father/son, father/daughter, mother/daughter and more – could make your head spin, and most readers will be able to relate to this in some way.

Jensen’s relationship with his father is strained at best, and with Bella, a young attorney learning to assert her independence, he finds common ground.  The two are determined to learn the secrets behind the suspicious parole of the person responsible for his sister’s death.

If you’re a fan of family drama and mystery/suspense, this series is for you.  Now to move on to the third book!