#BadMoonRising The Ferryman and the Sea Witch by D. Wallace Peach #paranormal #mermaids #TuesdayBookBlog

This author is known for her beautiful prose and imagery, whether in poetry or her fiction books. I’ve reread passages in several of her novels because of their lyrical quality. Talk about eerie – her tarot card reading from many years ago may have predicted something that didn’t turn up until decades later in her life. Welcome D. Wallace Peach!

Have you ever had a tarot card reading?

Of course, Teri. And thanks for the fun questions. I’m delighted to be visiting during this bad, bad moon. I’ve had many tarot readings, and for a while I became absorbed in giving them too. The most unusual one I received was when I first married my husband. We both had children from a previous marriage, and the reader said I shouldn’t have more kids because it could damage my heart. We never did have more children (for various reasons) and my heart was fine… until my fifties. I wonder sometimes whether the tarot cards knew something that I didn’t discover until twenty years later.

Was there a horror movie you refused to watch because the previews were too scary?

I had to ask my husband the name of the movie because, of course, I never watched it. Hellraiser. That was a bazillion years ago in 1987, so I don’t know if I’d feel the same way now. He watched it with our kids when the tykes were about ten years old, and they all loved it. Now it’s the twisted psychopaths that totally creep me out because they could be REAL.

Do you ever see figures in your peripheral vision?

Oh yeah. My youngest brother was murdered in 2003 (my own little horror story), and after his death, I saw him everywhere. I’d pull over in the car, stare at people, follow them like a stalker. I’m surprised I didn’t get a crick in my neck from all the doubletakes. It was very disorienting. And eventually it stopped. Apparently, this happens to a lot of people. I wonder… is it wishful thinking or is the person’s soul making its presence known?

Would you and your main character get along?

That depends on the book. My main characters tend to live hard lives, and they take everything so seriously. They’re usually honorable people at the core, but who needs all that drama? Not me. The exception may be Madlyn in the Sorcerer’s Garden. She’s self-deprecating and snarky, two qualities that I find irresistible, especially the snark. It’s my lightest book, and I think she’d be fun to hang out with around a fire pit and drink wine.

If you decided to write a spinoff of a side character, who would you choose?

I have a lot of side characters that I think might have a good story inside them, usually from stand-alone books where there’s more story to explore. In my recent high seas fantasy, The Ferryman and the Sea Witch, there’s been some reader interest in Grier. He’s lazy, sarcastic, self-serving, and at times, remarkably noble. Who know? He may get his own book someday.

What do you do to get inside your characters’ heads?

I write extensive bios on my main and secondary characters before I ever start writing. I know everything about them from their hobbies down to their fears, hopes, and deep dark secrets. They’re fully formed before I write my first sentence. I was also a mental health clinician in the real world, and I think those years exploring people’s emotional lives helped. My husband can always tell what type of scene I’m writing by the look on my face. His frequent question: “Are you okay?”

Thanks for the fun Teri. Happy October!

The merror rule the sea. Slender creatures, fair of face, with silver scales and the graceful tails of angelfish. Caught in a Brid Clarion net, the daughter of the sea witch perishes in the sunlit air.

The queen of the sea bares her sharp teeth and, in a fury of wind and waves, cleanses the brine of ships and men. But she spares a boy for his single act of kindness. Callum becomes the Ferryman, and until Brid Clarion pays its debt with royal blood, only his sails may cross the Deep.

Two warring nations, separated by the merrow’s trench, trade infant hostages in a commitment to peace. Now, the time has come for the heirs to return home. The Ferryman alone can undertake the exchange.

Yet, animosities are far from assuaged. While Brid Clarion’s islands bask in prosperity, Haf Killick, a floating city of derelict ships, rots and rusts and sinks into the reefs. Its ruler has other designs.

And the sea witch crafts dark bargains with all sides.

Callum is caught in the breach with a long-held bargain of his own which, once discovered, will shatter this life.

Buy Links

Amazon global link: http://a-fwd.com/asin=B095J5X8DW

Amazon Author’s page: https://www.amazon.com/D-Wallace-Peach/e/B00CLKLXP8

Author Bio:

A long-time reader, best-selling author D. Wallace Peach started writing later in life after the kids were grown and a move left her with hours to fill. Years of working in business surrendered to a full-time indulgence in the imaginative world of books, and when she started writing, she was instantly hooked.

In addition to fantasy books, Peach’s publishing career includes participation in various anthologies featuring short stories, flash fiction, and poetry. She’s an avid supporter of the arts in her local community, organizing and publishing annual anthologies of Oregon prose, poetry, and photography.

Peach lives in a log cabin amongst the tall evergreens and emerald moss of Oregon’s rainforest with her husband, two owls, a horde of bats, and the occasional family of coyotes.

Social Media Links

Author’s website: https://dwallacepeachbooks.com

Authors blog: https://mythsofthemirror.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dwallacepeach

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DWPeachBooks/

124 thoughts on “#BadMoonRising The Ferryman and the Sea Witch by D. Wallace Peach #paranormal #mermaids #TuesdayBookBlog

    1. D.L. Finn, Author

      I haven’t seen Hellraiser, never been on my radarto watch. I think the cards can pick up on things too even if it takes 20 years to confirm it. Sorry about your brother but I believe our loved ones are always near if weneed them. Great interview and I enjoyed getting to know Diana better 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

    2. Ha ha. Hellraiser was so scary-looking, wasn’t it? I’m glad I’m not the only one who was freaked out, Priscilla. I used to work as a grief counselor and seeing “the departed” everywhere was quite common but rarely talked about. Is it psychological or paranormal? I don’t know. Happy Halloween!

      Liked by 1 person

  1. It is so great to learn more about Diana here today, Teri. Diana, as you well know I love working with Tarot cards and find the readings to be uncanny and relevant. As for your brother, YES, I believe they can make their presence known. Maybe he was trying to comfort you, or to get a message through. Eventually, he had to transition on into the other world. I LOVED The Ferryman and The Sea Witch! A great story. Thanks for hosting, Teri!

    Liked by 4 people

    1. We’re on the same page, Jan. I love your tarot readings and rune readings. And I also believe that there is more to this world and life and spirit than we can perceive with our limited senses. Best to be open and curious. And thanks for the boost for the book! Happy Halloween!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Such a great interview, Teri. It’s nice to learn more about Diana. And the book sounds like a winner. I had a Tarot reading years ago. And the hard times with a marriage came true! Also dabbled in Handwriting analysis. And Numerology. And had my European Sidereal & US birth chart done. Amazing how accurate! I haven’t seen people who have passed. But, thoughts about them come at interesting times. Especially when I write. Sort of like Muses, hanging around to help. So sorry about your brother, Diana. 📚🎶 Christine

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Oooh that’s freaky about the hard times of your marriage coming true, Christine. I often find these things very accurate too. I love using Celtic runes – they’re my go-to. And how cool that people in your life who’ve passed still hang around… like muses. Thanks for the kind comment and for taking the time to read. I’m delighted to be hanging out at Teri’s. Happy Halloween!

          Liked by 1 person

  2. I’m so sorry about your brother, Diana. I can’t even imagine… Thank you for sharing. Your answers were wonderful, and it was a delight getting to learn more about you. As for The Ferryman and the Sea Witch? It was fabulous. Best wishes to you.

    Thanks, Teri.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. It was a terrible time, Staci, but also one of growth on a lot of levels. I don’t have any answers, but it sure did raise lots of questions about the nature of being. I’m glad you enjoyed the interview. I’m happy to be here. Happy Halloween!

      Liked by 3 people

    1. I think so, Joan. I’m open to a whole lot of things that are beyond what’s proveable. The “seeing is believing” perspective has always seemed limited to me with our narrow scope of vision. 🙂 Thanks for the kind comment and Happy Halloween!

      Liked by 2 people

  3. Pingback: Bad Moon Rising | Myths of the Mirror

    1. Thanks for the visit and kind comment, Liz. I’m just delighted to be part of Teri’s BMR this year. I’ve learned over the years to be open to the invisible and to accept that there’s a lot we don’t know. Working in hospice certainly invited paranormal experiences into daily life. 🙂 Have a wonderful day and Happy Halloween!

      Liked by 2 people

  4. Nice questions and interview Teri. It is fun to learn more about Diana and her writing methods. Diana, I’m sorry to hear about your brother. You have an interesting process to start with long bios about your characters. They certainly have depth and character!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks for checking out the interview, Brad. I’m glad you enjoyed it. Those bios take a long time to prepare, but for me, they make the actual writing go a lot faster. If the characters know who they are, their reactions and decisions are “right there” and I don’t need to labor over them. That makes for less rewriting too. Have a lovely week, my friend, and Happy Halloween. Hugs.

      Liked by 2 people

  5. So good to see Diana here today, Teri! And what a fascinating interview, too. Diana, I learned so much about you this morning, and I must say, I’m totally impressed! The Tarot card thing blew me away! Whoa! That was a pretty specific prediction to have come true. Gulp.

    As for The Ferryman and the Sea Witch, I can’t recommend it highly enough to folks who enjoy fantasy. What a great tale, but then, that’s what I’ve come to expect from your books. I’ve read enough of them now to know I can expect beautifully written stories about well-developed characters I’m fully invested in. However, I have not (YET) read Sorcerer’s Garden, and I can see I need to do so SOON! I luv me some snark, especially from someone who isn’t being mean about it. Will bump that one up on my Kindle for sure!

    Here’s wishing you continued success with Ferryman and ALL of your books, Diana. Great reading, for sure! 🤗💖🤗

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Isn’t that weird about the tarot reading? I don’t know if that would have stopped me from having another kid if that’s what I wanted, but when it came together later, it was freaky, and I’ve wondered since if that reading was a true warning. And thanks so much for the wonderful comment about my books. If you read The Sorcerer’s Garden someday, I’d be thrilled. It’s the closest I’ve come to writing myself into a book. Lol. Thanks for dropping by, my friend, and Happy Halloween!

      Liked by 3 people

      1. I’m eager to get going on The Sorcerer’s Garden, and will definitely be thinking of you as I read it! (And I’ve ignored the “Ooops” below, as per your request.😁)

        I’ve never had a Tarot reading, as I never really wanted to know what might be coming my way. Too afraid it might scare me, I guess.

        Happy Halloween back atcha! And happy writing ahead, too. 🤗

        Liked by 2 people

  6. Great answers, Diana. So sorry to hear about your brother. I too lost a brother and for years thought I saw him in a crowd etc. My daughter, who was only 3 months old when he died, says she often feels his presence. I’m sure he’s keeping an eye on us, which is comforting.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I worked in grief counseling and hospice for years, Darlene, and seeing our departed loved ones is more common than people realize. I’m not surpriised that you had that experience as well. And that’s so interesting about your daughter’s sensing her uncle’s presence. Human visual perception is so limited, and we tend to discount what we can’t see (or empirically prove). Someday, again, we may see face to face. Hugs. And Happy Halloween!

      Liked by 3 people

  7. Gwen M. Plano

    What an incredible interview! Thank you for the wisdom and the deep shares, Diana. I’m so sorry about your brother, and I can imagine seeing him everywhere. Love ones stay near, don’t they? 💗 Another great showcase, Teri, thank you.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thanks for the visit and kind comment, Gwen. I was so looking forward to my day on BMR with Teri. It was a great way to return to blogging. I think our loved ones stick around as long as we need them too, but who knows?! I suppose I’ll find out someday. 🙂 Happy Halloween, my friend.

      Liked by 2 people

  8. Diana, I can’t imagine the horror and emotional trauma of losing your brother in such a tragic way. Losing a loved one is hard enough. Perhaps his spirit was trying to comfort you.

    This was an wonderful interview, and if I may lend a prod or two, I would LOVE to see a Greir get his own book. He was such a surprise and a standout character.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thanks for the visit and the kind comment, Mae. It was terribly traumatic and the murder was never solved. I think it explains why my books can get a little dark at times. But I’ve grown and learned from the experience too. And thanks for the nudge on Grier. He’d be a challenge, but he was fun to write. Happy Halloween! And enjoy your month of Nano. 😀

      Liked by 3 people

  9. Victoria Zigler

    Interesting about the tarot reading. Sometimes things seen in readings can take some time to come to pass, other times they can happen quickly, and still other times the fact you’re aware of them may influence whether or not they happen due to it – whether conciously or not – influencing your decisions. That’s my belief anyhow.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Great comment, Victoria. I agree you with that timing and results may not match our expectations. This took decades to surface, and I wonder what might have happened if I’d made different choices. Thanks so much for stopping by to check out the interview. It was super fun to participate. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  10. I like this multi-dimensional interview. Thanks for sharing it girls. Tarot reading fascinates me but I’ve never indulged in it, as it sounds mind-boggling and misleading… future prediction is stressful.
    The only horror movie I saw was The Exorcist and decided I would never see any more of such freaky movies!
    Diana, your answers are as good as your books. Congratulations!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thanks for dropping by, Balroop. I so looked forward to playing with Teri’s BMR questions. Tarot generally is a little vague, but I think the person who did my reading was exceptionally intuitive or something. And I’m with you on horror movies… the really scary ones are too much for me, though I love a good vampire or werewolf tale. Have a great week, my friend. 😀

      Liked by 2 people

  11. Pingback: #BadMoonRising – Post 26 Featuring D. Wallace Peach | The Write Stuff

    1. Thanks for dropping by, John. I hadn’t thought about that tarot card reading in years, and it popped into my head with Teri’s question. I love reading her interviews and was delighted to participate. Thanks for the kind comment about Grier too. He’s a card, for sure. Happy Halloween!

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Hi Diana, I am very sad to learn about your brother’s murder. What a dreadful thing for your family. My mom and I were the victims of a home invasion 1o years ago. We were held up at gun point and for months I keep seeing guns and the perpetrators everywhere I went. Your experience was most likely more spiritual in nature as you saw your brother. I put mine down to adrenaline and anxiety. Thanks for hosting Diana, Teri.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. OMG, Robbie. What a terrifying experience. I didn’t know that about you, and I can’t even imagine how traumatizing that was. I’m not surprised that it raised your anxiety and vigilance. I appreciate your vist and kind words about my brother. I hope his visits were real and not just a trick of grief. Thanks for stopping by and I hope you have a bright day. ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  13. I love Diana’s books, she’s phenomenal! I’ve never had a tarot card reading- put it down to being cynical- but it sounds like it’s a good thing you listened to the advice.
    I’m so sorry for your family’s loss. It’s not something you ever get over, I’m sure {{hugs}}

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thanks for stopping by and commenting, Jacquie. I’m cynical about the “invisible” too, in a way, but I also realize that there is way more to the universe than our puny brains can begin to fathom. Only a few hundred years ago, the technology of today would have seemed utterly magical (and probably evil too). When my grandson tells me that magic isn’t real (which is what his father tells him) I always ask him for proof. Lol. And I appreciate the kind comment about my brother. I hope he’s still hanging around. 😀 Happy Halloween.

      Liked by 2 people

  14. Very interesting post, Diana, and your latest book sound really intriguing, and the reviews I’ve read are all great. I love horror movies, so I can’t recall ever refusing to watch one or avoiding it, although there are other genres that I’ve either not enjoyed or try to avoid, for example, erotica, or over-the-top sugary ones. All the best and have fun.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thanks for the visit, Olga. I’m delighted to be over here at Teri’s for BMR. I agree with you on erotica or sappy movies. I’d rather watch horror. Hehe. And thanks for the kind comment on the book. It’s done well. I think I’ll stick with stand-alones for a while. They’re much easier to write. Have a great week, my friend. 😀

      Liked by 1 person

  15. I love reading interviews because they bring out something we don’t normally talk about. I’m sorry to hear about your brother, Diana. That was the worse nightmare you had. I can’t even imagine what the horror and sorrow were like. I can believe that you saw him everywhere as if he was alive.
    I think many of your side characters in The Ferryman can become main characters since you have their bios written already.
    When hubby watches horror movies next time, I’ll sit with him in the same room, watch my own YouTube but glance at the screen once in a while. Just to say that I’ve watched a horror movie, hehe! Honestly, I did that.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thanks for the kind comment, Miriam. I think the cruelty of my brother’s death is why I write stories with a bit of darkness. I’m still processing my outrage – but in a healthy way! 😀 And that’s so funny that you watch youtube and only peek at the television. I should try that this Halloween. Maybe tonight! I’ll have to snuggle up to the hubby. Thanks for the idea!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Even when my sister died of congestive heart failure in 2019, and I watched the blood gushing out of her nose, I’m still horrified.
        The outrage about your brother’s death won’t go away.😔 Writing dark stories could play tricks in your mind of different scenarios. Take care, my friend! Enjoy your Halloween movie. 🎃👻

        Liked by 2 people

  16. What a wonderful Q & A! So sorry to hear about the loss of your brother, Diana. To lose somebody in such a tragic way is just unthinkable. I loved the Hellraiser movies (first three). Clive Barker writes some of the best horror in the business. Thanks for hosting Diana, Teri.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. There were three Hellraisers??? Lol. I guess horror fans like it. I think I read one Clive Barker book years and years ago, Beem, and couldn’t believe how scared I got. I should try one again soon. Thanks for the visit here at Teri’s and for the kind comment. Have a great week and Happy Halloween!

      Liked by 2 people

  17. Bad moon, but GREAT interview. I always wonder if the tarot reads our future or facilitates potential futures. The original Hellraiser is a unique type of “oh no, what am I watching?” I do agree on the twisted psychopaths though. Very intense about your brother and I think both options are possible. Here’s to finding that peace though. As for your books, Madlyn does sound like my type of charming 😀 follow up question, what wine would you drink? And oh, I’ve gotten the are you okay question a plenty.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I love chatting through comments, JD, so ask away. 🙂 I think Madlyn would drink a cheap pinot. 🙂 Even a twist top. Lol. She’s pretty snarky about anything hoity-toity, and she’d think $100 for wine would be better spent reattaching the rear view mirror on her junk car or feeding a homeless man (which is exactly what happens in the book!) Thanks for reading the interview and for the great question. 🙂 It was a lot of fun. Have an awesome day.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. hahaha kinda love she’d go for cheap Pinot… though truth be told, sometimes half the fun is finding that $8-$10 bottle that everyone goes DANG! And I like that attitude. To well invested money! And you also have a great day. Pinot cheers

        Liked by 2 people

    1. Isn’t it funny how tastes within a family can be so different? My daughter loved horror and would watch it with her dad while I hid out in another part of the house. Lol. Thanks for checking out the interview, Bette. Teri’s questions were a lot of fun. And thanks for the smile about my writing. Happy Maine Halloween, and huge hugs.

      Liked by 2 people

  18. Psychopaths are very scary – okay, kind of fascinating in a study of abnormal psychology kind of way – but I wouldn’t want one to fixate on me. Wonderful answers to all the questions, Diana. Good to see you back 🤗

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks so much for stopping by, Tessa. I had a lot of fun with Teri’s questions. And yes, psychopaths are interesting to study, but yeesh, I don’t ever want to meet one under any circumstances! I’ll stick with aliens and monsters. Happy Halloween, my friend. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  19. What an interesting interview – great angle, Teri! Oh, but so sorry for your loss, Diana, and the fact that the case was never cleared up.

    Now I shall have to get hold of the Sorcerer’s Garden, Madlyn really appeals to me. Of course, I’d love to hear more about Grier, who wouldn’t after reading The Ferryman and the Sea Witch? 🙂

    Wishing you both a wonderful day!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Aren’t Teri’s interview questions fun, Chris? I was so excited to play along this year. Thanks for the kind comment about my brother as well as about the books and my characters. I’m looking forward to spending time with a few new ones over November. Have an excellent day and Happy Writing!

      Liked by 2 people

  20. alexcraigie

    The sudden death of a young person bites deep but for the cause to be murder adds another level of distress and I’m so sorry that you have that horror to bear. To lack closure can be enough to prevent people from moving on in their lives and so it’s good that you have an outlet in your wondrous writing. I loved your Unraveling the Veil series, and The Ferryman and the Sea Witch was spellbinding, too. Grier was one of those characters that begins to steal the scene from a more honourable protagonist – I’d love to read more about him. And now I must look into The Sorcerer’s Garden.
    Many thanks, Teri, for these great interviews.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks so much for the lovely visit, Trish, and for your kind comment. I’m so glad you’ve enjoyed my books and characters. Grier was a fun one to write and Madlyn of The Sorcerer’s Garden was right up there too. It’s a twisty tale. I hope you have a wonderful day and Happy Hallows Eve!

      Liked by 1 person

  21. What a FABULOUS interview, Teri. You knew just the right questions to ask. I feel like I’ve gotten to “know” Diana over the years through her blog and her magnificent books, but gawd, I didn’t know about the Tarot cards. I’m always a bit scared to have my future read. But I’d let Diana read tarot cards to me any time. I once had my palm read, and the reader (a woman in her mid-50s, whom I never met before) looked right into my soul. It was s c a r y, because she told me truthful things I didn’t want to hear.
    Anyway, a book with Grier as main character would be HOT. Because he is. :–)
    Lastly, yes, I’ve seen long-gone friends out of the periphery of my eye – years after they’re gone. I don’t think it’s our imagination. And I think it’s a beautiful energy sighting of love. ❤

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thanks for the great comment, Pam. We think we know all about each other and then the right question brings about another reveal! Teri’s BMR interviews are so fun. That’s pretty cool about your palm reading. I think some “readers” are extemely perceptive regardless of the vehicle they use for channeling information. Hopefully always for the good of all. And that cracks me up that you thought Grier was HOT. Lol. While writing him, I can’t tell you how many times I wanted to throw him overboard. Lastly, I love your thought, “it’s a beautiful energy sighting of love.” Huge Hugs, and Happy Halloween. ❤

      Liked by 3 people

  22. Fascinating story about the Tarot cards. I sometimes think we project ourselves into the cards and they “feed” us back with a dash of inner wisdom or insight. The metaphysical world is so amazing to me. Love your book cover! Can you tell us the designer?

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks for the visit, Paula. The metaphysical world intrigues me too. Most of the readings I get seem to point to universal challenges and the human journey. They’re meaningful, but can also apply to many people in many situations. The one I got about kids and heart troubles was so specific! That’s why it was so memorable when I actually did have heart trouble.

      And thanks so much for the kind comment about the cover. I did this one myself. I was kidding with another blogger that I wrote the book just so I could make the cover. Lol. It’s almost true! Have a wonderful day. ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  23. suerovens

    Really awesome interview! But yes, can someone please explain Hellraiser to me? I’ve seen it and read about it and I STILL don’t quite get the concept. LOL. Maybe it’s too “fantasy/sci-fi” for me. AND OWLS? You have owls? OMG. I need to know more. (and about the bats too).

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks so much, Sue, for the fun comment. You cracked me up. I haven’t watched Hellraiser, so I can’t answer your question. But now, I kind of want to see it… sci-fi/fantasy??? Maybe I’ve been missing out! And I do have a mating pair of wild owls who hang around my yard and deck and hoot at each other. They’re very loud. The bats and I have been in a years-long struggle as to who uses my writing room. Never a dull moment. Have a great day and Happy Halloween!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. suerovens

        Owls and bats? You truly live in a magical wonderland! I’m jealous! (although we did have a few bats get in at our old house and the kitties were NOT amused…)

        Liked by 2 people

          1. suerovens

            Agreed about wildlife INdoors. Two kitties are enough for us. We did manage to live trap a groundhog recently. He/She was taking up residence underneath our deck. Not cool, but VERY adorable. We baited the trap with cantaloupe. 🙂

            Liked by 2 people

            1. Ha ha. Cantelope? I’ll remember that. We don’t have any indoor pets at the moment, so my husband is taming the chipmunks and squirrels to eat from his hand. The owls are immensely interested in his new rodent-friends.

              Liked by 2 people

    1. Don’t scare me, Teagan. Yikes! I’d rather read books and watch movies about monsters and vampires… which I don’t think are real. Are they? And thanks for the kind comment about the Ferryman and the Sea Witch. Huge hugs, my friend. Happy Halloween.

      Liked by 1 person

  24. really enjoyed this, Diane. Very interesting answers. I can a a wee bit re seeing things but it is random. So what you said re the Tarot cards was fascinating. I remember telling friend when she’d said she would never get grandchildren, that she would. There would be two boys for that particular son, alone. Like that she wanted to know how that could possibly be since this was a second marriage for the woman and she couldn’t possibly have any more. I told her I had no idea. I did not have that bit of it but this was what I could see. Sure enough a year later that marriage broke up. He remarried and there’s now two boys. Sorry to read about your brother.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. That’s so cool that you have a bit of “the sight,” Shey. I’m a firm believer that we only understand a fraction of this universe, especially the invisible world around us that our eyes haven’t the ability to see. Just because something can’t be proved (right now) doesn’t mean it isn’t true. Thanks for checking out the interview and for your fun comment. Have a Happy Halloween. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  25. I’ve seen the movie Hellraiser. It was one of the most bizarre movies I’ve ever seen. I don’t think I’ve watched anything quite like it since then. I think there was a sequel, too, but I didn’t think much about it. Then again, rarely are sequels as good as the original.

    That’s awful news about your brother, Diana. I’m so sorry to read about it. I wonder why you did stop seeing him in your peripheral vision. It’s almost like he moved on to whatever awaits us all.

    Liked by 1 person

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