The Ones We’re Meant To Find by Joan He #bookreview #scifi #YA

One of the most twisty, surprising, engaging page-turner YAs you’ll read this year—We Were Liars meets Black Mirror, with a dash of Studio Ghibli.

Cee awoke on an abandoned island three years ago. With no idea of how she was marooned, she only has a rickety house, an old android, and a single memory: she has a sister, and Cee needs to find her.

STEM prodigy Kasey wants escape from the science and home she once trusted. The eco-city—Earth’s last unpolluted place—is meant to be sanctuary for those commited to planetary protection, but it’s populated by people willing to do anything for refuge, even lie. Now, she’ll have to decide if she’s ready to use science to help humanity, even though it failed the people who mattered most. 

I saw reviewers raving about this book on Goodreads and a few blogs. Being a sci-fi fan, I had to request it.

While this cover is beautiful, it doesn’t scream sci-fi/dystopia to me. I honestly assumed it was YA contemporary until I read the description, and I’m afraid it may be targeting the wrong group of readers. The worldbuilding is the big standout for me in this novel. Earth is overpolluted and nearly uninhabitable, and citizens have taken to living in ecocities in the sky. If you rank high enough, that is. Most people don’t and have little chance of getting in. Oceans are poisoned and natural disasters occur frequently, killing millions. Time is running out.

Told in alternating POVs between Cee and Kasey, discrepancies in their stories arise early in the book. By Cee’s count, she’s been on the island three years. Kasey says she’s been missing only months. The mystery about what exactly is going on will keep readers turning the pages, but I have to admit I guessed it early. I’ve probably read too many sci-fi books, and I came across a similar premise in another novel a few years ago that clued me in.

If contemporary fans pick this up, I suspect the strong bond between the sisters will be the draw for them, and it’s a driving force in the plot. Cee loves life and is carefree, while Kasey is more at home in a science lab working alone. With me being more a fan of sci-fi than contemporary, the relationship aspect didn’t appeal to me as much.

It’s a grim story, but comes with stunning plot twists that have surprised most readers and complex worldbuilding. If you’re a fan of sci-fi/dystopia who enjoys mysterious puzzles or like reading novels with strong sibling bonds, this book may captivate you.

I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.  Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

19 thoughts on “The Ones We’re Meant To Find by Joan He #bookreview #scifi #YA

  1. Yeah, okay, dystopia, mysterious puzzles, and emotional sibling bonds… I’m in. But, wow, that cover. No. I wouldn’t have picked it up to read a dystopian. I agree–it’s misleading, to say the least.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. That cover is beautiful but you’re right – it does not say sci-fi (which has become a red flag for me – genre and cover not matching). It sounds like an interesting story. I would definitely like the mystery plot line. Good review, Teri ❤️

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Thanks for this mindful review, Teri. It is a familiar plot, that I’ve seen several times. But I’ve found that sometimes I still enjoy the storytelling. The description “grim” lets me know that I need to be in the right mood for reading it — that’s where your reviews are so helpful. Hugs on the wing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’d say you’d definitely have to be in the right mindset to read this. As with most dystopians, the worldbuilding can be pretty depressing at times. Hugs, Teagan!

      Like

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