Immoral Code by Lillian Clark #bookreview #YA #thriller

For Nari, aka Narioka Diane, aka hacker digital alter ego “d0l0s,” it’s college and then a career at “one of the big ones,” like Google or Apple. Keagan, her sweet, sensitive boyfriend, is happy to follow her wherever she may lead. Reese is an ace/aro visual artist with plans to travel the world. Santiago is off to Stanford on a diving scholarship, with very real Olympic hopes. And Bellamy? Physics genius Bellamy is admitted to MIT—but the student loan she’d been counting on is denied when it turns out her estranged father—one Robert Foster—is loaded.

Nari isn’t about to let her friend’s dreams be squashed by a deadbeat billionaire, so she hatches a plan to steal just enough from Foster to allow Bellamy to achieve her goals. 

Although I’m far from a computer genius (it’s a miracle I’ve managed my blog for so long), hacking stories fascinate me.  Nothing is private anymore, and a good hacker can get nearly any information they desire.  And that’s downright scary.

These five friends are fiercely loyal and supportive of each other, and it’s understandable that they want to help Bellamy.  Suspension of disbelief isn’t anything new to me – plenty of stories require it.  But in this case, a phone call to MIT’s admissions office seems like a logical first step before planning a heist of this magnitude – especially considering the numerous laws broken by these teens and the potential consequences of their actions.  Yes, Bellamy’s dad is a total deadbeat for not having any contact with her, but it would have been more believable if all other possibilities had been exhausted.

Some of the interactions and dialogue between this group are amusing, and I especially enjoyed Bellamy’s rational and literal explanations of things.  Even though the dialogue is entertaining at times, there’s a tremendous amount of it among this group that does nothing to advance the plot, and other than Bellamy, I had trouble distinguishing the voices of each character.  Writing from five POVs is admirable and allows the reader more insight into the characters, but I referred back to the chapter header numerous times to see who was speaking.

Looking at other reviews, I’m in the minority on this one.  If you enjoy a good heist story (and who doesn’t?), strong friendship bonds, witty banter, and are able to suspend disbelief, this may be the book for you.  In my case, I was hoping the plot would be heavier on the heist action.  Immoral Code is scheduled for publication February 19th, 2019.

Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the ARC.

 

15 thoughts on “Immoral Code by Lillian Clark #bookreview #YA #thriller

  1. Five POVs is a lot, but I’m not usually bothered by that—unless they’re written in first person. Then it can be really hard to distinguish so many characters.
    I’m curious if this book was written in first.

    Liked by 1 person

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